MCC To Amend Cricket Rules

MCC

MCC to amend cricket rules: The Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), private member’s club dedicated to development of cricket, is expected to change some amendments in some cricket rules. The annual general meeting is scheduled in Lord’s on Wednesday and if these Laws of Cricket will be passed then will come to affect from October 1, 2010. The expected changes will be about the umpires offering light to batsmen, boundary fielding rules, run outs where the batsman loses his bat after making his ground and penalties on batsmen who damage the pitch. The MCC members will also be asked to concede authority on passing new Laws of Cricket to the MCC Laws sub-committee and main committee. MCC committed is headed by John Barclay as President of committee. Club chairman is Oliver Stocken and Treasurer for the committee is Justin Dowley. Committee has large numbers of members from across the world and MCC is the world’s most famous cricket club. MCC’s role remains as relevant as ever. From guarding the game’s Laws to safeguarding its Spirit, and from promoting cricket to young people to looking after Lord’s, MCC is committed to the good of the game.

MCC

Umpire will not offer lights to batsmen: The umpires will not be offering light to the batsmen side. According to changes to laws 3.8 and 3.9 relates about suspending of play due to the fitness of the ground, weather or light. Presently, the decision about staying in middle or coming off from ground was often made on tactical basis that best suits the batting side instead of grounds of safety or visibility. But, after these changes, umpires will now only suspend game in bad light if they will consider it to be dangerous and unreasonable. Here unreasonable refer to being inappropriate rather than condition which are simply not very good. The new law should result in less playing time being lost. It is the concept which has been trailed by the ECB in county cricket with positive feedback. Changes are also expected in toss. Law 12.4 and 12.5 involves the toss laws and in law 12.4, it was felt that it would be good if one or both of umpires are present during the toss. Law 3.1 states that umpire shall be at ground at least 45 minutes before the play starts. According to current law, winning captain can delay his decision for 10 minutes but now after amendment in law 12.5, they will have to tell their decision straightway to another captain so that they can get more time to prepare their strategy.

MCC

Amendment in fielding rules: Some fielding rules are also under consideration for changes. Law 17 is concerned with practice on field and law 17.1 has clarified that the area which can never be used for practice as being the pitch and the two strips either side of it. Law 17.2 clears about the when and what practice may take place on rest of square while law 17.3 outlines practice on the outfield. A ban has been placed on the fielders partaking in practice with a coach or with 12th player during the play as club noticed that this practice is increasing and need to be controlled on time. Due to such practices time wastes and the over rates becomes slower. So, no more time is to be wasted for any such practice any more on the ground during play. Law about boundary is also under amendment by MCC. A new law 9.4 has been formed to clarify whether the ball is beyond the boundary of not. In recent time, increasingly athletic pieces of fielding on the boundary have brought this area of law into consideration. The law forming sub-committee realized that it would be wrong to allow a fielding watching that ball is flying over his head for boundary, to retreat beyond the boundary and then jumping upward and escape the ball back towards the field of play. According to law 19.4, the fielder should be first in contact with the ball and must be when some part of the player is on the ground with in boundary. If he is airborne then his final contact with the ground before touching the ball was within the boundary area. Amendment in bowling is about the feet position while bowling. Many slow bowler while bowling with their front foot going right across to the other side of the stumps. This meant that a bowler could say that he was bowling over the wicket but release the ball as though bowling round the wicket. This law is expected to change as law committee felt it is not fair. Particularly taking into account the positioning of the sight-screen, and as a result altered the Law so that the bowler’s front foot must land with some part of his foot. Whether grounded or raised, between the return creases on the side on which he runs up past the wicket and an imaginary line joining the two middle stumps.

MCC

Batting rules amendments about running and damages: According to amendment in Law 28.1, any part of the striker’s bat is capable of putting the wicket down. These circumstances arise rarely but the club is aware of situations where the bat has broken while hitting the ball and a part of the bat has hit the stumps, putting the wicket down. Laws sub-committee felt these conditions unfortunate dismissal for a batsman as a part of his bat broken off should be treated as in the similar fashion as a bat that has fallen out of his hand. Another law 29.1 has been amended. According to this law, a batsman who has been running to make his ground will be considered to be in his ground if having grounded some part of his foot behind the popping crease and still continuing forward his momentum and loses his contact with ground. It will be useful in televised games where a player clearly made his ground but at the moment that the wicket was put down he was not in contact with ground because he was running. Law 42.14 which involves the damaging of pitch by batsman has also amended so that batting side receives one less warning than under the present law. In present laws, warning is given for first offence while on second offence run is disallowed with warning. And on more offences, any runs scored are disallowed, 5 penalty runs are awarded to the fielding side and a report is lodged with the appropriate Governing body. Now with the new laws, warning will be given once, but any repetition will see any runs scored disallowed, five penalty runs awarded to the fielding side and a report being lodged with the appropriate governing body. It is similar to bowlers damaging pitches laws 14.13.

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