Life of Indian Students In Australia

Life of Indian students in Australia
Life of Indian students in Australia

Life of Indian students in Australia: As a study destination, Australia has been offering high quality of education along with its fine lifestyle to the students from around the world. But as far as the position of Indian students in Australia is concerned, the number has gone down by straight 40 percent recently as compared to the last year. Although Australia has been favorite destination for migrating Indian students over past many years but since mid 2009, young Indian students in metro cities like Melbourne & Sydney have faced racial attacks and the conditions have worsened ever since for the Australian Education International programme. Pursuing an MBA from Australian universities requires funds upto 40,000$ a year, which is not so affordable for most of the students, combined with the cost of living. To cope up with their expenses, most of the students adapt to taking part-time jobs like working in late night convenience stores and petrol stations. And they have to use public conveyance to remote stations, some of which are not even properly secured. And there are around 20,000 indian students in Sydney, which happens to be much less than the population of the community in Melbourne. But still majority of the Indians roam around either alone or in a group of 2, hence attracting racist abuses and attacks by groups of misled native Australians. It all started from racial abuses and it has reached its extreme now when two Indians were assaulted recently, viz. Nitin Garg, a PR in Melbourne stabbed to death on 2nd January and Ranjodh Singh in New South Wales on 29th december.

Life of Indian students in Australia
Life of Indian students in Australia

Indian government should ask for security: Though it’s a serious matter of international concern for Australian government and the Indian government has asked for strong steps to be taken for security of all the students of India’s origin, but the over cry resulted from the brutal assault has warned all the Indian parents most of whom have already put Australia out of all the options to be considered for their child’s higher studies or careers. Glenn Wither, the chief executive of Universities Australia, said a reduction in Indian students would be likely to have a greater impact on vocational colleges, where a greater proportion of Indians enrolled. The students who have already moved to Australia in a year or so don’t have any option but to pursue their degrees, hoping that Australian government would take some concrete steps to avoid any such racist attack in future. But to get even a part-time job in Australia is not that easy of a job for an Indian unless he has an Australian PR, which requires meeting even tougher constraints. As contacted, many of the students there put it like this, “Come here to study only if you have some friends already living over here. Australia is not amongst places who welcome strangers.” Well, that might be their perceptions but still, an Indian student’s life in Australia doesn’t sound quite easy as compared to those studying in the States or Europe.

Life of Indian students in Australia
Life of Indian students in Australia

AEI made strong movement: Andrew Smith, chief executive of the Australian Council for Private Education and Training, said he was expecting a “significant” decline in enrolments this year from several countries, including India and China. Australian Education International which is the international arm of the Australian Governments Department of Education Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) is too aware of the changing situations and the responsible causes. Its role is to enhance the international education links between Australia & India and provide information about the Australian education system to students interested in the opportunities available in Australia. And to ensure that the decrease in number of Indian students be compensated as soon as possible, AEI has made strong movements from the security point of view.

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